On being poor in attachment

“It is the Christian’s privilege to be rich in material things,” wrote Francis de Sales, “and poor in attachment to them, thereby having the use of riches in this world and the merit of poverty in the next.”

… No one will ever own themselves to be avaricious; everyone denies this contemptible vice: men excuse themselves on the plea of providing for their children, or plead the duty of prudent forethought: they never have too much, there is always some good reason for accumulating more; and even the most avaricious of men not only do not own to being such, but sincerely believe that they are not; and that because avarice is as a strong fever which is all the less felt as it rages most fiercely.

Moses saw that sacred fire which burnt the bush without consuming it, but the profane fire of avarice acts precisely the other way, – it consumes the miser, but without burning, for, amid its most intense heat, he believes himself to be deliciously cool, and imagines his insatiable thirst to be merely natural and right.

If you long earnestly, anxiously, and persistently after what you do not possess, it is all very well to say that you do not wish to get it unfairly, but you are all the time guilty of avarice. He who longs eagerly and anxiously to drink, though it may be water only, thereby indicates that he is feverish.

St. Francis de Sales

May we be rich in material things and poor in attachment to them.

May we hold on to them like fire – letting things go as is needed for the common good.


St. Francis de Sales was born to a noble family at Chateau de Sales in the Kingdom of Savoy near Geneva, Switzerland on August 21, 1567 – during the same era of the Calvinist movement.

He is best known for his book, Introduction to the Devout Life, written for ordinary lay people in 1608. Originally written as a series of letters, it became an instant success all over Europe — though some clergy rejected the notion that lay men and women could achieve holiness in the experience of their daily life. Some tore it up because Francis encouraged dancing and jokes!

About R.H. (Rusty) Foerger

As I enter the third third of life, I am becoming aware of the role of elders today “to enlarge spiritual vision, being devoted to prayer, living in the face of death, as a living curriculum of the Christian life” (Dr. James M. Houston). I am a life long and life wide learner who seeks to: *decipher the enigma of our worth *rescue from the agony of prayerlessness *integrate spiritual friendship.
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